Document Detail


Lateral posterior fossa encephalocele with associated migrational disorder of the cerebellum in an infant.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22044373     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Encephaloceles are acquired or congenital defects in which intracranial contents protrude through a defect in the calvaria. The embryogenesis of these lesions is incompletely understood. The vast majority of lesions occur at or near the anatomical midline. The authors present an extremely rare case of a laterally oriented, pathologically proven encephalocele associated with a posterior fossa cyst and cerebellar migrational defect in an infant. The authors review past and current theories of encephalocele formation as it relates to this case.
Authors:
Kimberly M Hamilton; Andrea L Wiens; Daniel H Fulkerson
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of neurosurgery. Pediatrics     Volume:  8     ISSN:  1933-0715     ISO Abbreviation:  J Neurosurg Pediatr     Publication Date:  2011 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-11-02     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101463759     Medline TA:  J Neurosurg Pediatr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  479-83     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Indiana University School of Medicine;
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