Document Detail


Language is not necessary for color categories.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23278932     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The origin of color categories is under debate. Some researchers argue that color categories are linguistically constructed, while others claim they have a pre-linguistic, and possibly even innate, basis. Although there is some evidence that 4-6-month-old infants respond categorically to color, these empirical results have been challenged in recent years. First, it has been claimed that previous demonstrations of color categories in infants may reflect color preferences instead. Second, and more seriously, other labs have reported failing to replicate the basic findings at all. In the current study we used eye-tracking to test 8-month-old infants' categorical perception of a previously attested color boundary (green-blue) and an additional color boundary (blue-purple). Our results show that infants are faster and more accurate at fixating targets when they come from a different color category than when from the same category (even though the chromatic separation sizes were equated). This is the case for both blue-green and blue-purple. Our findings provide independent evidence for the existence of color categories in pre-linguistic infants, and suggest that categorical perception of color can occur without color language.
Authors:
Ozge Ozturk; Shakila Shayan; Ulf Liszkowski; Asifa Majid
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Developmental science     Volume:  16     ISSN:  1467-7687     ISO Abbreviation:  Dev Sci     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-02     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9814574     Medline TA:  Dev Sci     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  111-5     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Language Acquisition Department, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Psychology, Princeton University, USA.
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