Document Detail


Lactation and pregnancy in Iran. I. Social and economic aspects.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  619600     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Adequacy of lactation was assessed in Teheran women of low (LSE) and lower-middle (MSE) socioeconomic status in the third month postpartum, as part of a study linking nutrition, hormonal status, and lactation. Methods of assessment of nutritional adequacy are discussed. Characteristics of the socioeconomic groups, infant mortality, food beliefs related to lactation, and supplemental feeding practices are described. Of the LSE mothers 15 to 30% and of the MSE mothers 40 to 55% had a fully adequate milk supply in the third month. Substitutes used and affordable by the LSE were nutritionally inadequate. LSE mothers were traditional in their food beliefs. MSE mothers demonstrate the influence of scientific nutrition knowledge. The low percentage of lactation adequacy even in the MSE indicates that other social or health factors associated with urban living conditions may be just as important as economic and nutritional factors in lactation failure.
Adequacy of lactation was assessed in Teheran, Iran, among women of low (LSE) and lower-middle (MSE) socioeconomic status in the 3rd month postpartum as part of a study linking nutrition, hormonal status, and lactation. Subjects were selected randomly from women with uncomplicated pregnancies who attended 2 clinics in Teheran within 2 weeks of the expected date of birth. Subjects were interviewed, anthropometric data were obtained, and a blood sample was taken for hormonal and nutritional evaluation. Socioeconomic data, medical history, and dietary intake information were obtained. Characteristics of the socioeconomic groups, infant mortality, food beliefs related to lactation, and supplemental feeding practices are described. The criteria of lactation adequacy used were based primarily on the classification of nutritional status in early childhood as proposed by McLaren and Read. 15-30% of the LSE and 40-55% of the MSE mothers had a fully adequate milk supply in the 3rd month. Substitutes used and affordable by the LSE mothers were nutritionally inadequate, and this group of mothers was traditional in their food beliefs. MSE mothers demonstrated the influence of scientific knowledge. The low percentage of lactation adequacy even among the MSE mothers indicates that other social or health factors associated with urban living conditions may be as important as economic and nutritional factors in lactation failure.
Authors:
C Geissler; D H Calloway; S Margen
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of clinical nutrition     Volume:  31     ISSN:  0002-9165     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Clin. Nutr.     Publication Date:  1978 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1978-02-23     Completed Date:  1978-02-23     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376027     Medline TA:  Am J Clin Nutr     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  160-8     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM; J    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Energy Intake
Female
Growth
Humans
Infant Mortality
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Iran
Lactation*
Lactation Disorders / etiology
Milk, Human
Pregnancy*
Socioeconomic Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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