Document Detail


Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to dietary sodium among 35- to 50-year-old Ontario residents.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20485696     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Excessive consumption of dietary sodium is an important public health issue. Little is known about the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to sodium consumption among Canadians.
OBJECTIVE: To examine knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to sodium consumption among a sample of Canadians 35 to 50 years of age.
METHODS: A random-digit-dial telephone survey was conducted among adults aged 35 to 50 years of age in two regions in Ontario. Logistic regression was used to examine the likelihood of having taken action in the past 30 days to reduce sodium consumption, and the likelihood that respondents were intending to reduce sodium in the next six months.
RESULTS: A total of 3130 interviews were completed. The majority of respondents were aware of excessive sodium consumption as a health issue and reported that they were taking action to reduce their dietary sodium intake. A large proportion of respondents did not correctly identify many foods as being high in sodium and, consequently, may have incorrectly believed they were consuming healthy amounts of sodium. Respondents who believed sodium reduction was important were more likely to have taken action to reduce sodium within the previous 30 days. Respondents who self-identified as consuming too much sodium were less likely to have taken action.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the present study suggest that in addition to policy changes designed to reduce the sodium content of foods, there is a need to address the low levels of knowledge surrounding sources of excessive sodium in popular Canadian foods, the importance of a reduced intake of sodium and the availability of lower-sodium alternatives.
Authors:
Sophia Papadakis; Andrew L Pipe; Isabella A Moroz; Robert D Reid; Christopher M Blanchard; Danielle F Cote; Amy E Mark
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Canadian journal of cardiology     Volume:  26     ISSN:  1916-7075     ISO Abbreviation:  Can J Cardiol     Publication Date:  2010 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-05-20     Completed Date:  2010-06-07     Revised Date:  2011-07-28    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8510280     Medline TA:  Can J Cardiol     Country:  Canada    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e164-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Minto Prevention and Rehabilitation Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario. spapadakis@ottawaheart.ca
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior*
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
Health Promotion
Humans
Hypertension / epidemiology,  etiology,  prevention & control*
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Probability
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment
Sex Factors
Sodium, Dietary / administration & dosage*,  adverse effects
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Sodium, Dietary
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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