Document Detail


Iron deficiency of liver, heart, and brain in newborn infants of diabetic mothers.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1625067     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Infants of diabetic mothers frequently have polycythemia, elevated serum erythropoietin concentrations, and decreased serum iron and ferritin concentrations, likely representing a redistribution of fetal iron into erythrocytes to support augmented fetal hemoglobin synthesis. We hypothesized that fetal liver, heart, and brain iron concentrations are also reduced in these infants. After obtaining autopsy tissue from infants who had died before 7 days of age, we measured liver, heart, and brain iron concentrations using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Seven infants of diabetic mothers and seven gestational age-matched control infants were studied. All infants of diabetic mothers had pancreatic islet cell hyperplasia, indicating fetal hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Liver iron concentrations in the infants of diabetic mothers were 6.6% of control values (489.0 +/- 154.4 vs 7379.7 +/- 1473.8 micrograms/gm dry tissue weight (mean +/- SEM); p less than 0.001), heart iron concentrations were 43.9% of control values (124.7 +/- 20.5 vs 284.1 +/- 34.8 micrograms/gm dry tissue weight; p less than 0.002), and brain iron concentrations were 60.6% of control values (106.1 +/- 13.7 vs 175.2 +/- 10.7 micrograms/gm dry tissue weight; p less than 0.003). Heart and brain iron concentrations were directly correlated with liver iron concentrations (r = 0.80 for both; p less than 0.001) and indicated that hepatic iron was greater than 75% depleted before heart and brain iron reduction. We conclude that severely affected infants of diabetic mothers have reduced liver, heart, and brain iron concentrations. The role of tissue iron deficiency in the genesis of the abnormal clinical findings in these infants deserves further consideration.
Authors:
C D Petry; M A Eaton; J D Wobken; M M Mills; D E Johnson; M K Georgieff
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of pediatrics     Volume:  121     ISSN:  0022-3476     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Pediatr.     Publication Date:  1992 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1992-08-07     Completed Date:  1992-08-07     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0375410     Medline TA:  J Pediatr     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  109-14     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Anoxia / metabolism
Brain Chemistry*
Cerebral Cortex / chemistry
Female
Fetal Diseases / metabolism
Humans
Hyperglycemia / metabolism
Hyperinsulinism / metabolism
Hyperplasia
Infant, Newborn / metabolism*
Iron / analysis*,  deficiency
Islets of Langerhans / pathology*
Liver / chemistry*
Myocardium / chemistry*
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics*
Retrospective Studies
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
7439-89-6/Iron

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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