Document Detail


Investigation of the association between excess winter mortality and socio-economic deprivation.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10912556     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Excess winter mortality is higher in England and Wales than in other European countries with similar or lower average winter temperatures. It might be expected that excess winter mortality would be higher in areas with greater socio-economic deprivation, and if this were so preventive interventions could be directed at populations in these areas. The association between deprivation and excess winter mortality has not been adequately investigated in the past. The aim of this study was to look at the association between excess winter mortality and socio-economic deprivation, so that policy decisions to reduce this excess mortality could be appropriately directed. METHODS: Super Profile groups derived from the 1991 Census were used as a measure of socio-economic status. The age-standardized excess winter death index (EWDI) was calculated for each Super Profile group, for the population of Bradford. The EWDI was also calculated for the manufacturing districts (Office for National Statistics area classification), a relatively deprived group, and compared with that for England and Wales. RESULTS: No significant trend was found in age-standardized excess winter mortality across the Super Profile groups. The manufacturing districts had a similar EWDI to the national value. CONCLUSION: Excess winter mortality is not associated with deprivation. Further research to identify the important aetiological factors and appropriate interventions to reduce excess winter mortality is needed.
Authors:
D A Lawlor; D Harvey; H G Dews
Related Documents :
1354286 - Meta-analysis of intervention trials on case-management of pneumonia in community setti...
15748056 - Determinants of malaria mortality among displaced people in khartoum state, sudan.
10946136 - Reduction in tick numbers (haemaphysalis longicornis), mortality and incidence of theil...
8020086 - Re-examination of recent trends in under five mortality rates in zimbabwe: evidence fro...
12200916 - Subacute hepatic failure after the perinatal period with haemochromatotic siderosis at ...
2707496 - The performance of human infants on a measure of frontal cortex function, the delayed r...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of public health medicine     Volume:  22     ISSN:  0957-4832     ISO Abbreviation:  J Public Health Med     Publication Date:  2000 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-11-20     Completed Date:  2000-11-20     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9011205     Medline TA:  J Public Health Med     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  176-81     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Public Health, Nuffield Institute for Health, University of Leeds.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cause of Death
Child
Cold Temperature / adverse effects*
England / epidemiology
Female
Heating / statistics & numerical data
Housing / statistics & numerical data
Humans
Industry / statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality*
Population Surveillance
Poverty Areas*
Primary Prevention
Risk Factors
Seasons*
Social Class
Wales / epidemiology
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
J Public Health Med. 2001 Mar;23(1):84   [PMID:  11315704 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Comparison of the SF-36 health survey questionnaire with the Nottingham Health Profile in long-term ...
Next Document:  The new UK National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC); investigating social class di...