Document Detail


Investigating the causes of low birth weight in contrasting ovine paradigms.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15774527     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) still accounts for a large incidence of infant mortality and morbidity worldwide. Many of the circulatory and transport properties of the sheep placenta are similar to those of the human placenta and as such, the pregnant sheep offers an excellent model in which to study the development of IUGR. Two natural models of ovine IUGR are those of hyperthermic exposure during pregnancy, and adolescent overfeeding, also during pregnancy. Both models yield significantly reduced placental weights and an asymmetrically growth-restricted fetus, and display altered maternal hormone concentrations, indicative of an impaired trophoblast capacity. Additionally, impaired placental angiogenesis and uteroplacental blood flow appears to be an early defect in both the hyperthermic and adolescent paradigms. The effects of these alterations in placental functional development appear to be irreversible. IUGR fetuses are both hypoxic and hypoglycaemic, and have reduced insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and elevated concentrations of lactate. However, fetal utilization of oxygen and glucose, on a weight basis, remain constant compared with control pregnancies. Maintained utilization of these substrates, in a substrate-deficient environment, suggests increased sensitivities to metabolic signals, which may play a role in the development of metabolic diseases in later adult life.
Authors:
J M Wallace; T R H Regnault; S W Limesand; W W Hay; R V Anthony
Related Documents :
20840257 - The role of adipocytokines in fetal growth.
8199077 - The individualised birthweight ratio: a new method of identifying intrauterine growth r...
18986677 - Exposure to persistent organic pollutants in utero and related maternal characteristics...
19228317 - Association between maternal seafood consumption before pregnancy and fetal growth: evi...
3283717 - Accuracy of ultrasound diagnoses in pregnancies complicated by suspected fetal anomalies.
7710857 - Total and methyl mercury levels in human scalp hairs of typical populations in china by...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review     Date:  2005-03-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of physiology     Volume:  565     ISSN:  0022-3751     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Physiol. (Lond.)     Publication Date:  2005 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-05-18     Completed Date:  2005-08-16     Revised Date:  2013-06-09    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0266262     Medline TA:  J Physiol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  19-26     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK. jacqueline.wallace@rri.sari.ac.uk
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Cardiovascular System / embryology,  physiopathology
Diet
Disease Models, Animal*
Energy Metabolism*
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation / embryology*,  physiopathology*
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight*
Infant, Newborn
Models, Animal
Models, Biological
Placenta / physiopathology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects*
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
Sheep
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DK28794/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; DK52138/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; HD20761/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HD41505/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HD42815/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
J Physiol. 2005 May 15;565(Pt 1):1   [PMID:  15790658 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Increased cardiac sympathetic nerve activity following acute myocardial infarction in a sheep model.
Next Document:  Defective place cell activity in nociceptin receptor knockout mice with elevated NMDA receptor-depen...