Document Detail


Intrinsic signal optical imaging of brain function using short stimulus delivery intervals.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20079373     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI) can be used to map cortical function and organization. Because its detected signal lasts 10+s consisting of three phases, trials are typically collected using a long (tens of seconds) stimulus delivery interval (SDI) at the expense of efficiency, even when interested in mapping only the first signal phase (e.g., ISOI initial dip). It is unclear how the activity profile can change when stimuli are delivered at shorter intervals, and whether a short SDI can be implemented to improve efficiency. The goals of the present study are twofold: characterize the ISOI activity profile when multiple stimuli are delivered at 4s intervals, and determine whether successful mapping can be attained from trials collected using an SDI of 4s (offering >10x increase in efficiency). Our results indicate that four stimuli delivered 4s apart evoke an activity profile different from the triphasic signal, consisting of signal dips in a series at the same frequency as the stimuli despite a strong rise in signal prior to the 2nd to 4th stimuli. Visualization of such signal dips is dependent on using a baseline immediately prior to every stimulus. Use of the 4-s SDI is confirmed to successfully map activity with a similar location in peak activity and increased areal extent and peak magnitude compared to using a long SDI. Additional experiments were performed to begin addressing issues such as SDI temporal jittering, response magnitude as a function of SDI duration, and application for successful mapping of cortical function topography.
Authors:
Cynthia H Chen-Bee; Teodora Agoncillo; Christopher C Lay; Ron D Frostig
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2010-01-14
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of neuroscience methods     Volume:  187     ISSN:  1872-678X     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Neurosci. Methods     Publication Date:  2010 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-03-04     Completed Date:  2010-05-25     Revised Date:  2014-09-20    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7905558     Medline TA:  J Neurosci Methods     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  171-82     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Brain / physiology*
Brain Mapping / methods*
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Evoked Potentials / physiology
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Motor Cortex / physiology*
Physical Stimulation
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted*
Vibrissae / physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
NS-055832/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; NS-43165/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; NS-48350/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS043165/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS043165-01A2/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS048350/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS048350-01A1/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS055832/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS055832-01A2/NS/NINDS NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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