Document Detail


Intraduodenal administration of intact pea protein effectively reduces food intake in both lean and obese male subjects.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21931864     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Human duodenal mucosa secretes increased levels of satiety signals upon exposure to intact protein. However, after oral protein ingestion, gastric digestion leaves little intact proteins to enter the duodenum. This study investigated whether bypassing the stomach, through intraduodenal administration, affects hormone release and food-intake to a larger extent than orally administered protein in both lean and obese subjects.
METHODS: Ten lean (BMI:23.0±0.7 kg/m²) and ten obese (BMI:33.4±1.4 kg/m²) healthy male subjects were included. All subjects randomly received either pea protein solutions (250 mg/kg bodyweight in 0.4 ml/kg bodyweight of water) or placebo (0.4 ml/kg bodyweight of water), either orally or intraduodenally via a naso-duodenal tube. Appetite-profile, plasma GLP-1, CCK, and PYY concentrations were determined over a 2 h period. After 2 h, subjects received an ad-libitum meal and food-intake was recorded.
RESULTS: CCK levels were increased at 10(p<0.02) and 20(p<0.01) minutes after intraduodenal protein administration (IPA), in obese subjects, compared to lean subjects, but also compared to oral protein administration (OPA)(p<0.04). GLP-1 levels increased after IPA in obese subjects after 90(p<0.02) to 120(p<0.01) minutes, compared to OPA. Food-intake was reduced after IPA both in lean and obese subjects (-168.9±40 kcal (p<0.01) and -298.2±44 kcal (p<0.01), respectively), compared to placebo. Also, in obese subjects, food-intake was decreased after IPA (-132.6±42 kcal; p<0.01), compared to OPA.
CONCLUSIONS: Prevention of gastric proteolysis through bypassing the stomach effectively reduces food intake, and seems to affect obese subjects to a greater extent than lean subjects. Enteric coating of intact protein supplements may provide an effective dietary strategy in the prevention/treatment of obesity.
Authors:
Maartje C P Geraedts; Freddy J Troost; Marjet J M Munsters; Jos H C H Stegen; Rogier J de Ridder; Jose M Conchillo; Joanna W Kruimel; Ad A M Masclee; Wim H M Saris
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2011-09-13
Journal Detail:
Title:  PloS one     Volume:  6     ISSN:  1932-6203     ISO Abbreviation:  PLoS ONE     Publication Date:  2011  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-09-20     Completed Date:  2012-02-28     Revised Date:  2013-06-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101285081     Medline TA:  PLoS One     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e24878     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. M.Geraedts@HB.unimaas.nl
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Cholecystokinin / blood
Eating / drug effects*
Ghrelin / blood
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 / blood
Humans
Male
Obesity / blood,  metabolism*
Peas / chemistry*
Peptide YY / blood
Plant Proteins / pharmacology*
Thinness / blood,  metabolism*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Ghrelin; 0/Plant Proteins; 106388-42-5/Peptide YY; 89750-14-1/Glucagon-Like Peptide 1; 9011-97-6/Cholecystokinin
Comments/Corrections

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