Document Detail


Intestinal permeability in patients with adverse reactions to food.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16880015     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: An abnormal intestinal permeability could contribute to establish an altered sensitivity to food-allergen. AIM: To evaluate the intestinal permeability in subjects with adverse reactions to food on allergen-free diet. SUBJECTS: Twenty-one patients with food allergy and 20 with food hypersensitivity on allergen-free diet were enrolled and divided in four groups according to the seriousness of their referred clinical symptoms when they were on a free diet. METHODS: Intestinal permeability was evaluated by Lactulose/Mannitol ratio urinary detection determined by anion-exchange chromatography. RESULTS: Statistically significant different Lactulose/Mannitol ratio was evidenced in subjects with food allergy (p=0.003) or hypersensitivity (p=0.0008) compared to control patients. The correlation between Lactulose/Mannitol ratio and the seriousness of clinical symptoms, by using Spearman test, was statistically significant for food allergy (p=0.0195) and hypersensitivity (p=0.005) patients. CONCLUSIONS: The present data demonstrate that impaired intestinal permeability, measured in our conditions, is present in all subjects with adverse reactions to food. In addition, for the first time, we report a statistically significant association between the severity of referred clinical symptoms and the increasing of Intestinal Permeability Index. These data reveal that intestinal permeability is not strictly dependent on IgE-mediated processes but could better be related to other mechanisms involved in early food sensitisation, as breast-feeding, or microbial environment that influence the development of oral tolerance in early infancy.
Authors:
M T Ventura; L Polimeno; A C Amoruso; F Gatti; E Annoscia; M Marinaro; E Di Leo; M G Matino; R Buquicchio; S Bonini; A Tursi; A Francavilla
Related Documents :
18510695 - Asthma induced by inhalation of flour in adults with food allergy to wheat.
18771485 - Should children with a history of anaphylaxis to foods undergo challenge testing?
18088015 - Methodological issues in the diagnostic work-up of food allergy: a real challenge.
14792335 - The use of raw foods as skin testing material in allergic disorders.
7865075 - Professional topical fluoride applications--clinical efficacy and mechanism of action.
17050095 - Levels of foot pad dermatitis in broiler chickens reared in 5 different systems.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2006-07-31
Journal Detail:
Title:  Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver     Volume:  38     ISSN:  1590-8658     ISO Abbreviation:  Dig Liver Dis     Publication Date:  2006 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-09-11     Completed Date:  2007-02-01     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100958385     Medline TA:  Dig Liver Dis     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  732-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Immunology and Infectious Diseases (MIDIM), University of Bari Medical School, Policlinico, Piazza G. Cesare n 11, 70124 Bari, Italy. mt.ventura@allergy.uniba.it
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Food / adverse effects*
Food Hypersensitivity / metabolism*
Humans
Intestinal Absorption / physiology*
Intestines / metabolism*,  physiopathology
Lactulose / urine
Male
Mannitol / urine
Middle Aged
Permeability
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
4618-18-2/Lactulose; 69-65-8/Mannitol

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Bran and irritable bowel syndrome: the primary-care perspective.
Next Document:  Influence of childhood sexual abuse on pregnancy, delivery, and the early postpartum period in adult...