Document Detail


Intestinal parasitic infestations among children in an orphanage in Pathum Thani province.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12929999     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Infection caused by intestinal parasites is still a common health problem especially in children from developing countries. Orphans are a group of underprivileged population in society. To evaluate the intestinal parasitic infections in children in an orphanage in Pathum Thani province, Thailand, stool samples were collected during a cross-sectional study in April 2001. Examination for intestinal parasites were performed by using simple smear, formalin-ether concentration, Boeck and Drbohlav's Locke-Egg-Serum (LES) medium culture and special staining (modified acid-fast and modified trichrome) techniques. A total of 106 pre-school orphans (60 males and 46 females), aged 10.0-82.0 months, were recruited for the study. There were 86 individuals (81.1%), 45 males and 41 females, infected with at least one parasite. Interestingly, most of the parasites identified were protozoa. Blastocystis hominis was found at the highest prevalence (45.2%). The infections caused by Giardia lamblia was 37.7 per cent and Entamoeba histolytica was 3.7 per cent. Other non-pathogenic protozoa found were Trichomonas hominis (39.6%), Entamoeba coli (18.8%), and Endolimax nana (3.7%). The only one case of helminth parasite detected was Strongyloides stercoralis (0.9%). The sensitivity for detection of B. hominis and T. hominis was increased by the LES culture technique. No history of diarrhea symptoms were recorded among these orphans. However, during the investigation, stools of all infected cases were noted for six characteristics including formed, soft, loose, mucous, loose-watery and watery. The present study emphasized the problems of protozoan infections among these orphans. Health educations as well as routine surveillance is necessary in order to control the infections.
Authors:
Wilai Saksirisampant; Surang Nuchprayoon; Viroj Wiwanitkit; Sutin Yenthakam; Anchalee Ampavasiri
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet     Volume:  86 Suppl 2     ISSN:  0125-2208     ISO Abbreviation:  J Med Assoc Thai     Publication Date:  2003 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-08-21     Completed Date:  2003-10-07     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7507216     Medline TA:  J Med Assoc Thai     Country:  Thailand    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  S263-70     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic / epidemiology*
Male
Orphanages / statistics & numerical data*
Thailand / epidemiology

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