Document Detail


Intestinal microbiota of 6-week-old infants across Europe: geographic influence beyond delivery mode, breast-feeding, and antibiotics.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20479681     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: : There are many differences in diet and lifestyle across Europe that may influence the development of the infant gut microbiota. This work aimed to assess the impact of geographic area, mode of delivery, feeding method, and antibiotic treatment on the fecal microbiota of infants from 5 European countries with different lifestyle characteristics: Sweden, Scotland, Germany, Italy, and Spain.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: : Fecal samples from 606 infants (age 6 weeks) recruited within the European project INFABIO were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with flow cytometry using a panel of 10 rRNA targeted group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes. Information on factors potentially affecting gut microbiota composition was collected with questionnaires and associations were evaluated with multivariate analyses.
RESULTS: : The Bifidobacterium genus was predominant (40% average proportion of total detectable bacteria), followed by Bacteroides (11.4%) and enterobacteria (7.5%). Northern European countries were associated with higher proportions of bifidobacteria in infant feces, whereas a more diverse microbiota with more bacteroides characterized southern countries. Bifidobacteria dominated the microbiota of breast-fed infants, whereas formula-fed babies had significantly higher proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus groups. Newborns delivered by cesarean section or from mothers treated with antibiotics perinatally had lower proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Atopobium cluster.
CONCLUSIONS: : Delivery mode and feeding method influenced the fecal microbiota of European infants at 6 weeks, as expected, but the effect of country of birth was more pronounced, with dominant bifidobacteria in northern countries and greater early diversification in southern European countries.
Authors:
Matteo Fallani; David Young; Jane Scott; Elisabeth Norin; Sergio Amarri; Rüdiger Adam; Marga Aguilera; Sheila Khanna; Angel Gil; Christine A Edwards; Joël Doré;
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition     Volume:  51     ISSN:  1536-4801     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Pediatr. Gastroenterol. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2010 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-06-28     Completed Date:  2011-01-12     Revised Date:  2013-02-07    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8211545     Medline TA:  J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  77-84     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Unité d'Ecologie et de Physiologie du Système Digestif, Jouy en Josas, France.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology*
Bacteria / classification*,  drug effects,  genetics
Bottle Feeding*
Breast Feeding*
Cesarean Section*
Colon / drug effects,  microbiology*
Colony Count, Microbial
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Europe
Feces / microbiology
Female
Genes, rRNA
Humans
Infant
Infant Formula
Oligonucleotide Probes
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0/Oligonucleotide Probes

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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