Document Detail


Intestinal DC in migrational imprinting of immune cells.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23295361     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Dendritic cells (DCs) have a pivotal role in instructing antigen-specific immune responses, processing and presenting antigens to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and producing factors capable to modulate the quality of T-cell responses. In this review, we will provide an historic overview on the identification of the mechanisms controlling lymphocyte migration into the largest immune organ of the body: the gut, and we will describe how in recent years an unexpected role for DCs has emerged as the architects in programming gut-homing immune cells. Specifically, we will review how intestinal DCs utilize the dietary vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) to program gut-homing lymphocytes and how intestinal DCs acquire the unique capacity to become RA producers.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 8 January 2013; doi:10.1038/icb.2012.73.
Authors:
Angus Stock; Giorgio Napolitani; Vincenzo Cerundolo
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-1-08
Journal Detail:
Title:  Immunology and cell biology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1440-1711     ISO Abbreviation:  Immunol. Cell Biol.     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-1-8     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8706300     Medline TA:  Immunol Cell Biol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
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