Document Detail


The interrelationship between hypertension and blood pressure, attendance at religious services, and race/ethnicity.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20354789     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The relationships between race/ethnicity and hypertension or blood pressure (BP), as well as frequency of religious services attendance and hypertension/BP are well documented. However, the association between these three factors is poorly understood. Using national data, this interrelationship was assessed in non-Hispanic whites and blacks, and Mexican-Americans (n = 12,488). Compared to those who never attended services, whites who attended services weekly had lower odds of hypertension, as did blacks who attended more than weekly. There was no relationship between attendance and hypertension among Mexican-Americans. Attendance was inversely related to systolic BP for all groups, but more so for whites and blacks compared to Mexican-Americans. These results further demonstrate the benefits of increased attendance at religious services on hypertension/BP, but suggest that these benefits were not as advantageous for all.
Authors:
Caryn N Bell; Janice V Bowie; Roland J Thorpe
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of religion and health     Volume:  51     ISSN:  1573-6571     ISO Abbreviation:  J Relig Health     Publication Date:  2012 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-06-12     Completed Date:  2012-10-22     Revised Date:  2013-03-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  2985199R     Medline TA:  J Relig Health     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  310-22     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. cbell@jhsph.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
African Americans / statistics & numerical data*
Aged
Attitude to Health / ethnology*
Blood Pressure
European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data*
Female
Health Status
Hispanic Americans / statistics & numerical data*
Humans
Hypertension / ethnology*,  prevention & control
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Religion and Medicine*
Risk Factors
Social Behavior
Spirituality
United States / epidemiology
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
P60 MD000214-10/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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