Document Detail


Interactions in Colonies of Primitively Social Bees: Artificial Colonies of Lasioglossum zephyrum.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16591931     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Lasioglossum zephyrum usually lives in small colonies but is facultatively solitary. Lone bees and colonies produced from female pupae of the same generation were established in artificial indoor nests. Both the length of the prereproductive period and the number of cells produced per bee per day decreased with increasing colony size. In most colonies, ovarially and behaviorally recognized castes arose, a queen and workers, but with all intergradations. The mean size of queens was larger than that of workers. Nearly all queens mated although few workers did so in rooms with a few males, but mating had no effect on subsequent behavior or ovarian development. In groups of diverse age there was a tendency for the oldest bees to be queens; queens also were larger on the average than workers. In groups of equal age, the largest bee was most often queen. As would be expected for a scarcely social species, mechanisms of social integration (resulting in division of labor and differentiation of castes) mostly appear to involve behavioral features of the solitary ancestors and accidental results of joint occupancy of nests. There is no evidence of direct food or pheromone transfer among adult bees.
Authors:
C D Michener; D J Brothers; D R Kamm
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America     Volume:  68     ISSN:  0027-8424     ISO Abbreviation:  Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.     Publication Date:  1971 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-06-29     Completed Date:  2010-06-29     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7505876     Medline TA:  Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1241-5     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66044.
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