Document Detail


Integrating technology into standard weight loss treatment: a randomized controlled trial.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23229890     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: A challenge in intensive obesity treatment is making care scalable. Little is known about whether the outcome of physician-directed weight loss treatment can be improved by adding mobile technology.
METHODS: We conducted a 2-arm, 12-month study (October 1, 2007, through September 31, 2010). Seventy adults (body mass index >25 and ≤40 [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]) were randomly assigned either to standard-of-care group treatment alone (standard group) or to the standard and connective mobile technology system (+mobile group). Participants attended biweekly weight loss groups held by the Veterans Affairs outpatient clinic. The +mobile group was provided personal digital assistants to self-monitor diet and physical activity; they also received biweekly coaching calls for 6 months. Weight was measured at baseline and at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-up.
RESULTS: Sixty-nine adults received intervention (mean age, 57.7 years; 85.5% were men). A longitudinal intent-to-treat analysis indicated that the +mobile group lost a mean of 3.9 kg more (representing 3.1% more weight loss relative to the control group; 95% CI, 2.2-5.5 kg) than the standard group at each postbaseline time point. Compared with the standard group, the +mobile group had significantly greater odds of having lost 5% or more of their baseline weight at each postbaseline time point (odds ratio, 6.5; 95% CI, 2.5-18.6).
CONCLUSIONS: The addition of a personal digital assistant and telephone coaching can enhance short-term weight loss in combination with an existing system of care. Mobile connective technology holds promise as a scalable mechanism for augmenting the effect of physician-directed weight loss treatment.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00371462.
Authors:
Bonnie Spring; Jennifer M Duncan; E Amy Janke; Andrea T Kozak; H Gene McFadden; Andrew DeMott; Alex Pictor; Leonard H Epstein; Juned Siddique; Christine A Pellegrini; Joanna Buscemi; Donald Hedeker
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  JAMA internal medicine     Volume:  173     ISSN:  2168-6114     ISO Abbreviation:  JAMA Intern Med     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-02-20     Completed Date:  2013-03-25     Revised Date:  2013-07-11    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101589534     Medline TA:  JAMA Intern Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  105-11     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 680 N Lake Shore Dr, Ste 1220, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. bspring@northwestern.edu
Data Bank Information
Bank Name/Acc. No.:
ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT00371462
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Computers, Handheld*
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity / therapy*
Technology
Telephone*
Weight Loss*
Weight Reduction Programs / methods*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL075451/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; K07 CA154862/CA/NCI NIH HHS; R01 HL075451/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2013 Mar;9(3):126   [PMID:  23296170 ]
JAMA Intern Med. 2013 Jan 28;173(2):111-2   [PMID:  23229914 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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