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Inhibition of drug efflux pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: current status of potentiating existing antibiotics.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23534361     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The emergence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus coupled with a declining output of new antibiotic treatment options from the pharmaceutical industry is a growing worldwide healthcare problem. Multidrug efflux pumps are known to play a role in antibiotic and biocide resistance in S. aureus. These membrane transporters are capable of extruding drugs and other structurally unrelated compounds, hence decreasing intracellular concentration and increasing survival. Coadministration of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) with antibiotics that are pump substrates could increase intracellular drug levels, thus bringing renewed efficacy to existing antistaphylococcal agents. Numerous EPIs have been identified or synthesized over the past two decades; these include existing pharmacologic drugs, naturally occurring compounds, and synthetic derivatives thereof. This review describes the current progress in EPI development for use against S. aureus.
Authors:
Bryan D Schindler; Pauline Jacinto; Glenn W Kaatz
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Future microbiology     Volume:  8     ISSN:  1746-0921     ISO Abbreviation:  Future Microbiol     Publication Date:  2013 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-03-28     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101278120     Medline TA:  Future Microbiol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  491-507     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
John D Dingell Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
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