Document Detail


Influences on infant-feeding beliefs and practices in an urban aboriginal community.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9343896     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The Victorian Aboriginal Health Service initiated a project to increase breast-feeding rates in the Melbourne Aboriginal community. The results of focus-group discussions on infant-feeding experiences and beliefs provided a wealth of information for the design of appropriate interventions. Most women wanted and expected to breast-feed. Some chose artificial feeding because of embarrassment, a belief that it is as good as breast-feeding, or perceptions that breast-feeding is painful and inconvenient. The most common reasons that women stopped breast-feeding were sore nipples, worries about their supply of milk and tiredness. Lack of knowledge, hospital practices, lack of support and appropriate advice, and lack of confidence and self-esteem contributed to these problems. Disruption of the passing on of knowledge of healthy infant-feeding practices between generations is another cultural loss suffered by Aboriginal communities. Efforts to restore traditional rates of breast-feeding need to be under Aboriginal control and to take account of these influences.
Authors:
W Holmes; L Thorpe; J Phillips
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Australian and New Zealand journal of public health     Volume:  21     ISSN:  1326-0200     ISO Abbreviation:  Aust N Z J Public Health     Publication Date:  1997 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1997-11-25     Completed Date:  1997-11-25     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9611095     Medline TA:  Aust N Z J Public Health     Country:  AUSTRALIA    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  504-10     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Victorian Aboriginal Health Service, Melbourne, Vic.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group*
Victoria

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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