Document Detail


Influence of weekend lifestyle patterns on body weight.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18551108     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether alterations in diet and/or activity patterns during weekends contribute to weight gain or hinder weight loss.
METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Randomized, controlled trial comparing 1 year of caloric restriction (CR) with 1 year of daily exercise (EX). Subjects included 48 healthy adults (30F, 18M) aged 50-60 years with BMI 23.5-29.9 kg/m(2). Body weight was measured on 7 consecutive mornings for a total of 165 weeks at baseline and 437 weeks during the 1-year interventions. Daily weight changes were calculated for weekends (Friday to Monday) and weekdays (Monday to Friday). Daily energy intake was estimated using food diaries; daily physical activity was measured using accelerometers. Both measures were validated against doubly labeled water (DLW).
RESULTS: At baseline, participants consistently gained weight on weekend days (+0.06 +/- 0.03 kg/day, (mean +/- s.e.), P = 0.02), but not on weekdays (-0.02 +/- 0.02 kg/day, P = 0.18). This was attributable to higher dietary intake on Saturdays and lower physical activity on Sundays relative to weekdays (both P < 0.05). During the interventions, both CR and EX participants were in negative energy balance on weekdays (P < 0.005). On weekends, however, CR participants stopped losing weight, and EX participants gained weight (+0.08 +/- 0.03 kg/day, P < 0.0001) due to higher dietary intakes on weekends. This helps to explain the slower-than-expected rate of weight loss during the interventions.
DISCUSSION: Alterations in lifestyle behaviors on weekends contribute to weight gain or cessation of weight loss on weekends. These results provide one explanation for the relatively slow rates of weight loss observed in many studies, and the difficulty with maintaining significant weight loss.
Authors:
Susan B Racette; Edward P Weiss; Kenneth B Schechtman; Karen Steger-May; Dennis T Villareal; Kathleen A Obert; John O Holloszy
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2008-06-12
Journal Detail:
Title:  Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)     Volume:  16     ISSN:  1930-7381     ISO Abbreviation:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Publication Date:  2008 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-08-01     Completed Date:  2008-10-21     Revised Date:  2014-09-08    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101264860     Medline TA:  Obesity (Silver Spring)     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1826-30     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Activities of Daily Living*
Body Weight / physiology*
Caloric Restriction*
Diet Records
Energy Intake / physiology
Exercise / physiology
Female
Humans
Life Style*
Male
Middle Aged
Weight Gain / physiology
Weight Loss / physiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
5U01 AG 20487/AG/NIA NIH HHS; AG 00078/AG/NIA NIH HHS; DK 56341/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; M01 RR000036/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; P30 DK056341/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P30 DK056341-07/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P30 DK056341-08/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; RR 00036/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; T32 AG000078/AG/NIA NIH HHS; U01 AG020487/AG/NIA NIH HHS
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From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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