Document Detail


Influence of maternal nutrition on birth weight.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  1103609     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This paper discusses some conditions necessary to detect an effect of maternal nutrition on birth weight and the relative contribution of calories and protein to such an effect. The expected dose- and time-response relationships for nutritional interventions aimed at the improvement of birth weight are also discussed. There appears to be a minimal level of nutrients which must be available in order to obtain adequate birth weight. However, above this minimum level, pregnant women can adapt themselves to a wide variety of food intake, both in quantity and quality, without affecting birth weight. The relative contribution of calories and protein to an increase in birth weight depends on the limiting nutrients of the home diet in the population under study. Other factors like physical activity, prevalence of disease and magnitude of the maternal nutritional stores before pregnancy are also important determinants of the relative contribution of calories and protein to birth weight. The anticipated input of a nutritional intervention on birth weight should range between 25 and 84 g of birth weight/10,000 kcal ingested during pregnancy. This estimate was computed from analyses based on four sources of published data: weight gain during pregnancy, prepregnant weight, fetomaternal body composition, and food intake during pregnancy. The expected reduction in proportion of low birth weight (LBW less than 2.5 kg) babies following a nutritional intervention will depend not only on the estimated range of fetal weight increase but also on the total amount of supplemented calories ingested during pregnancy as well as on the existent proportion of low birth weight babies prior to the intervention. The offspring of women who have low prepregnant weight, poor diet, low level of replacement of the home diet by the supplement, low physical activity during pregnancy and good health status will show larger increase in birth weight per unit of supplemented calories. Finally, nutritional interventions during pregnancy as opposed to earlier in the life of the mother, should have the higher impact on birth weight. In consequence, interventions as of pregnancy are recommended.
This paper discusses some conditions necessary to detect an effect of maternal nutrition on birthweight and the relative contribution of calories and protein to such an effect. The expected dose- and time-response relationships for nutritional interventions aimed at the improvement of birthweight are also discussed. There appears to be a minimal level of nutrients which must be available in order to obtain adequate birthweight. However, above this minimum level, pregnant women can adapt themselves to a wide variety of food intake, both in quantity and quality, without affecting birthweight. The relative contribution of calories and protein to an increase in birthweight depends on limiting nutrients of the home diet in the population under study. Other factors like physical activity, prevalence of disease, and magnitude of the maternal nutritional stores prior to pregnancy are also important determinants of the relative contribution of calories and protein to birthweight. The anticipated input of a nutritional intervention on birthweight should range between 25-84 g of birthweight/10,000 kcal ingested during pregnancy. This estimate was computed from analyses based on 4 sources of published data: weight gain during pregnancy, prepregnant weight, fetomaternal body composition, and food intake during pregnancy. The expected reduction in proportion of low birthweight (LBW or= 2.5 kg) babies following a nutritional intervention will depend not only on the estimated range of fetal weight increase but also on the total amount of supplemented calories ingested during pregnancy as well as on the existent proportion of low birthweight babies prior to the intervention. The offspring of women who have low prepregnant weight, poor diet, low level of replacement of home diet by the supplement, low physical activity during pregnancy, and good health status will show larger increase in birthweight/unit of supplemented calories. Finally, nutritional interventions during pregnancy as opposed to earlier in the life of the mother, should have the highest impact on birthweight. Consequently, interventions as of pregnancy are recommended.
Authors:
A Lechtig; C Yarbrough; H Delgado; J P Habicht; R Martorell; R E Klein
Related Documents :
20083959 - Nutrition and exercise prevent excess weight gain in overweight pregnant women.
11641919 - Pregnancy weight gain and its correlation to birth weight.
12521859 - Normal fetal growth pattern in a nigerian population.
8821679 - Comparative developmental toxicity of di-, tri- and tetrabutyltin compounds after admin...
11500729 - The relation of low birth weight to psychosocial stress and maternal anthropometric mea...
11527509 - Obesity and weight change related to parity and breast-feeding among parous women in br...
4020239 - Pregnancies following the frozen storage of expanding human blastocysts.
19695559 - Postpartum radical trachelectomy for ib1 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix diagnose...
12854929 - The philosophy of practice governs the rate of obstetric intervention: analysis of 212 ...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of clinical nutrition     Volume:  28     ISSN:  0002-9165     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Clin. Nutr.     Publication Date:  1975 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1976-01-29     Completed Date:  1976-01-29     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376027     Medline TA:  Am J Clin Nutr     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1223-33     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM; J    
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adaptation, Physiological
Birth Weight*
Body Composition
Body Weight
Diet Surveys
Dietary Proteins
Energy Metabolism
Female
Fetus / metabolism
Gestational Age
Guatemala
Humans
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Nutrition Disorders / diet therapy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
Nutritional Requirements
Pregnancy*
Pregnancy Complications
Rural Population
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dietary Proteins

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Intrapatient comparison of treatment with chlorthalidone, spironolactone and propranolol in normoren...
Next Document:  A new approach to Chinese traditional medicine.