Document Detail


Infants' pre-empathic behaviors are associated with language skills.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22728336     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Infants' responses to other people's distress reflect efforts to make sense of affective information about another person and apply it to oneself. This study sought to determine whether 12-month olds' responses to another person's display of negative affect reflect characteristics that support social learning and predict social functioning and language skills at 36 months. Measures of infants' responsiveness include congruent changes in affect and looking time to the person in distress. Attention to the examiner displaying positive affect, analyzed as a control condition, was not related to social functioning or language skills at 36 months. Neither attention nor affective response to the examiner's distress at 12 months was related to social functioning at 36 months. However, longer time spent looking at the examiner feigning distress predicted higher language scores. Moreover, infants who demonstrated a congruent affective response to distress had higher receptive language scores at 36 months than children who did not respond affectively. Importantly, these relations were not mediated by maternal education, household income, or 12-month verbal skills. These findings are consistent with the notion that adaptation to changes in a social partner's affective state supports an infants' ability to glean useful information from interactions with more experienced social partners. Infants' sensitivity to affective signals may thus be related to the ability to interpret other people's behavior and to achieve interpersonal understanding through language.
Authors:
Ted Hutman; Agata Rozga; Angeline DeLaurentis; Marian Sigman; Mirella Dapretto
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2012-06-20
Journal Detail:
Title:  Infant behavior & development     Volume:  35     ISSN:  1934-8800     ISO Abbreviation:  Infant Behav Dev     Publication Date:  2012 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-07-31     Completed Date:  2012-12-28     Revised Date:  2013-07-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7806016     Medline TA:  Infant Behav Dev     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  561-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, UCLA, United States. thutman@mednet.ucla.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age Factors
Attention / physiology
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive / physiopathology*
Child, Preschool
Empathy*
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior*
Language*
Language Development*
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Regression Analysis
Siblings
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
P50 HD055784/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; P50 HD055784/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U54 MH068172/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; U54 MH068172/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
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