Document Detail


Infants perceived as "fussy" are more likely to receive complementary foods before 4 months.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21220398     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to assess early infant-feeding patterns in a cohort of low-income black mothers and to examine associations between maternal perception of infant temperament and complementary feeding (CF) before 4 months.
METHODS: We used cross-sectional data from the 3-month visit (n = 217) of the Infant Care, Feeding and Risk of Obesity Study to assess relationships between early feeding of solids or juice and 6 dimensions of perceived infant temperament. Descriptive statistics were used to assess infant-feeding patterns, and logistic regression models were fit for each diet-temperament relationship found significant in the bivariate analyses.
RESULTS: Seventy-seven percent of the infants were fed solid foods at 3 months, 25% were fed juice, and 6% were exclusively breastfed. In multivariable analyses, 2 dimensions of perceived infant temperament were associated with early feeding of solid foods (distress-to-limitations odds ratio [OR]: 1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12-3.44]; activity-level OR: 1.75 [95% CI: 1.07-2.85]), whereas 1 dimension, low-intensity pleasure, was associated with early feeding of juice (OR: 0.51 [95% CI: 0.34-0.78]). Maternal characteristics significantly associated with early CF included breastfeeding, obesity, and depressive symptoms.
CONCLUSIONS: Low-income black mothers may represent a priority population for interventions aimed at improving adherence to optimal infant feeding recommendations. That maternal perceptions of several domains of perceived infant temperament are related to early CF suggests that this is an important factor to include in future observational research and in the design of interventions.
Authors:
Heather Wasser; Margaret Bentley; Judith Borja; Barbara Davis Goldman; Amanda Thompson; Meghan Slining; Linda Adair
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2011-01-10
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  127     ISSN:  1098-4275     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  2011 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-02-02     Completed Date:  2011-03-21     Revised Date:  2013-07-02    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  229-37     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516, USA. wasser@email.unc.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group / ethnology*,  psychology*
Breast Feeding / ethnology,  psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior / psychology*
Infant Food / adverse effects
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena / ethnology*
Mother-Child Relations / ethnology
Perception*
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DK56350/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 HD42219-02/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R24 HD050924-07/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; T32 HD057824-01/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
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