Document Detail


Infant nutrition and blood pressure in early adulthood: the Barry Caerphilly Growth study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12791629     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that environmental factors acting early in life may affect blood pressure in adulthood.
OBJECTIVE: The objective was to test the hypothesis that dried formula milk (derived from cow milk) intake in infancy is positively associated with blood pressure in early adulthood.
DESIGN: We conducted a long-term follow-up (1997-1999) of the Barry Caerphilly Growth study cohort (1972-1974) into which mothers and their offspring had originally been randomly assigned to receive a milk supplement or usual care. Participants were the offspring, who were aged 23-27 y at follow-up. The main outcome measures were systolic and diastolic blood pressure.
RESULTS: The social and demographic characteristics of the subjects who were (n = 679) and were not (n = 272) followed up were similar. For each increase in quartile of dried milk consumption (in oz) at 3 mo of age, there was a 1.28-mm Hg (95% CI: 0.46, 2.10 mm Hg) increase in systolic and a 0.63-mm Hg (95% CI: 0.04, 1.22 mm Hg) increase in diastolic blood pressure after adjustment for sex, intervention group, birth weight z scores, social class in childhood, age at follow-up, alcohol consumption, and pack-years of smoking. These coefficients were attenuated when adult body mass index and height were included in the models, but the association of dried milk consumption at 3 mo of age with systolic pressure remained significant (1.07 mm Hg; 95% CI: 0.27, 1.87 mm Hg).
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that high blood pressure in later life is influenced by early postnatal nutrition. Thus, interventions to optimize infant nutrition may have important long-term health benefits.
Authors:
Richard M Martin; Anne McCarthy; George Davey Smith; David P Davies; Yoav Ben-Shlomo
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The American journal of clinical nutrition     Volume:  77     ISSN:  0002-9165     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Clin. Nutr.     Publication Date:  2003 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-06-06     Completed Date:  2003-07-03     Revised Date:  2012-03-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376027     Medline TA:  Am J Clin Nutr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1489-97     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, United Kingdom. richard.martin@bristol.ac.uk
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aging / physiology*
Animals
Blood Pressure / physiology*
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena*
Male
Milk
Comments/Corrections
Erratum In:
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Mar;95(3):781-2

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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