Document Detail


Infant mortality and the health of survivors: Britain, 1910–50.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22069806     Owner:  HMD     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The first half of the twentieth century saw rapid improvements in the health and height of British children. Average height and health can be related to infant mortality through a positive selection effect and a negative scarring effect. Examining town-level panel data on the heights of school children, no evidence is found for the selection effect, but there is some support for the scarring effect. The results suggest that the improvement in the disease environment, as reflected by the decline in infant mortality, increased average height by about half a centimetre per decade in the first half of the twentieth century.
Authors:
Timothy J Hatton
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Economic history review     Volume:  64     ISSN:  0013-0117     ISO Abbreviation:  Econ Hist Rev     Publication Date:  2011  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-07-19     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100967146     Medline TA:  Econ Hist Rev     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  951-72     Citation Subset:  Q    
Affiliation:
Australian National University and University of Essex.
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