Document Detail


Infant mortality of Sami and settlers in Northern Sweden: the era of colonization 1750-1900.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22043216     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The Sami are one of very few indigenous peoples with an experience of a positive mortality transition.
OBJECTIVE: Using unique mortality data from the period 1750-1900 Sami and the colonizers in northern Sweden are compared in order to reveal an eventual infant mortality transition.
FINDINGS: The results show ethnic differences with the Sami having higher IMR, although the differences decrease over time. There were also geographical and cultural differences within the Sami, with significantly lower IMR among the South Sami. Generally, parity has high explanatory value, where an increased risk is noted for children born as number five or higher among siblings.
CONCLUSION: There is a striking trend of decreasing IMR among the Sami after 1860, which, however, was not the result of professional health care. Other indigenous peoples of the Arctic still have higher mortality rates, and IMR below 100 was achieved only after 1950 in most countries. The decrease in Sami infant mortality was certainly an important factor in their unique health transition, but the most significant change occurred after 1900.
Authors:
Peter Sköld; Per Axelsson; Lena Karlsson; Len Smith
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Historical Article; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2011-10-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Global health action     Volume:  4     ISSN:  1654-9880     ISO Abbreviation:  Glob Health Action     Publication Date:  2011  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-11-01     Completed Date:  2012-02-09     Revised Date:  2013-06-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101496665     Medline TA:  Glob Health Action     Country:  Sweden    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Centre for Sami Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. peter.skold@cesam.umu.se
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Arctic Regions
Female
Health Status*
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant Mortality / history*,  trends
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parity
Population Groups / history*,  statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Sweden
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