Document Detail


Infant and fetal mortality among a high fertility and mortality population in the Bolivian Amazon.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23092724     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Indigenous populations experience higher rates of poverty, disease and mortality than non-indigenous populations. To gauge current and future risks among Tsimane Amerindians of Bolivia, I assess mortality rates and growth early in life, and changes in risks due to modernization, based on demographic interviews conducted Sept. 2002-July 2005. Tsimane have high fertility (total fertility rate = 9) and infant mortality (13%). Infections are the leading cause of infant death (55%). Infant mortality is greatest among women who are young, monolingual, space births close together, and live far from town. Infant mortality declined during the period 1990-2002, and a higher rate of reported miscarriages occurred during the 1950-1989 period. Infant deaths are more frequent among those born in the wet season. Infant stunting, underweight and wasting are common (34%, 15% and 12%, respectively) and greatest for low-weight mothers and high parity infants. Regression analysis of infant growth shows minimal regional differences in anthropometrics but greater stunting and underweight during the first two years of life. Males are more likely to be underweight, wasted, and spontaneously aborted. Whereas morbidity and stunting are prevalent in infancy, greater food availability later in life has not yet resulted in chronic diseases (e.g. hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetes) in adulthood due to the relatively traditional Tsimane lifestyle.
Authors:
Michael Gurven
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2012-10-10
Journal Detail:
Title:  Social science & medicine (1982)     Volume:  75     ISSN:  1873-5347     ISO Abbreviation:  Soc Sci Med     Publication Date:  2012 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-11-20     Completed Date:  2013-05-10     Revised Date:  2013-12-04    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8303205     Medline TA:  Soc Sci Med     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  2493-502     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Bolivia / epidemiology
Cause of Death
Child, Preschool
Female
Fetal Mortality / trends*
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality / trends*
Infant, Newborn
Male
Regression Analysis
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 AG024119/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R01AG024119-01/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R56 AG024119/AG/NIA NIH HHS; R56AG024119-06/AG/NIA NIH HHS
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