Document Detail


Incorporating socio-economic and risk factor diversity into the development of an African-American community blood pressure control program.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9467699     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To develop culturally competent community based blood pressure control programs for inner-city African Americans. DESIGN: Cross sectional study of randomly selected households from three experimental and three control communities. SETTING: Very low, moderately low and moderate socio-economic status (SES) inner-city communities in Chicago, Illinois. PARTICIPANTS: 957 African Americans adults, aged 18 and over from target communities. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Household health assessments included employment, education and other demographic information, history of hypertension, disease prevalence, health behaviors, risk factor prevalence, stress, coping/John Henryism, social support, health care utilization and standardized assessments of blood pressure, height, and weight. RESULTS: There were no significant gender differences in blood pressure levels. Men had more hypertension than women, and women in the very low SES community had significantly more hypertension than women in the moderately low SES community. There was significantly more hypertension overall in the moderately low SES community. Age, education and BMI were the only factors significantly associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure in all three communities. The very low SES community had significantly more obesity and more uninsured persons than the other communities. CONCLUSIONS: Intraracial diversity is an important factor to be considered in the development of community blood pressure control programs for African Americans. Age, gender, educational background and SES play a major role in influencing health behaviors and access to health care.
Authors:
B Shakoor-Abdullah; J M Kotchen; W E Walker; T H Chelius; R G Hoffmann
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Ethnicity & disease     Volume:  7     ISSN:  1049-510X     ISO Abbreviation:  Ethn Dis     Publication Date:  1997  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1998-04-02     Completed Date:  1998-04-02     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9109034     Medline TA:  Ethn Dis     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  175-83     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Epidemiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans
African Continental Ancestry Group*
Age Distribution
Aged
Attitude to Health
Blood Pressure Determination
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health Education / methods*
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension / ethnology*,  prevention & control*
Incidence
Insurance, Health / statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Male
Mass Screening / methods*,  organization & administration
Middle Aged
Obesity / epidemiology
Program Development*
Reference Values
Risk Factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Physiological / epidemiology
United States / epidemiology
Urban Population
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL51222/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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