Document Detail


Incidence of dementia among atomic-bomb survivors--Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19327783     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Radiotherapy has been reported to cause neuropsychological dysfunction. Here we examined whether exposure to atomic bomb radiation affected the incidence of dementia among 2286 atomic bomb survivors and controls - all members of the Adult Health Study cohort. Study subjects were non-demented and aged >or=60 years at baseline examination and had been exposed in 1945 at >or=13 years of age to a relatively low dose (<or=4 Gy), compared with total dose from radiotherapy. Dementia diagnoses were made during biennial health examinations with a two-phase procedure. DSM IV criteria were used for diagnosing dementia, NINCDS-ADRDA for Alzheimer disease, and NINDS-AIREN for vascular disease. To estimate the effect of radiation on the dementia incidence rate, we applied Poisson regression analysis. Incidence per 1000 person-years was 16.3 in the <5 mGy group, 17.0 in the 5-499 mGy group, and 15.2 in the >or=500 mGy group. Alzheimer disease was the predominant type of dementia in each dose category. After adjustment for potential risk factors, radiation exposure did not affect the incidence rate of either all dementia or any of its subtypes. No case of dementia had a history of therapeutic cranial irradiation. Although we found no relationship between radiation exposure and the development of dementia among atomic bomb survivors exposed at >or=13 years old in this longitudinal study, effects on increased risk of early death among atomic bomb survivors will be considered.
Authors:
Michiko Yamada; Fumiyoshi Kasagi; Yasuyo Mimori; Takafumi Miyachi; Tomohiko Ohshita; Hideo Sasaki
Related Documents :
9772843 - Dementia is the major cause of functional dependence in the elderly: 3-year follow-up d...
6603463 - Computed tomography and positron emission transaxial tomography evaluations of normal a...
24351333 - Thiamine deficiency is associated with ethnicity in a subtropical area of china.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2009-03-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the neurological sciences     Volume:  281     ISSN:  1878-5883     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Neurol. Sci.     Publication Date:  2009 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-05-08     Completed Date:  2009-08-12     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0375403     Medline TA:  J Neurol Sci     Country:  Netherlands    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  11-4     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Studies, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan. yamada@rerf.or.jp
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Alzheimer Disease / epidemiology
Cognition / radiation effects
Cohort Studies
Dementia / epidemiology*
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Nuclear Weapons*
Poisson Distribution
Prospective Studies
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries*
Regression Analysis
Risk Factors
Survivors*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Children's mapping between symbolic and nonsymbolic representations of number.
Next Document:  Cognitive profile in fibromyalgia. Comparison with a mild cognitive impairment group.