Document Detail


Incidence and Characteristics of Snakebite Envenomations in the New York State Between 2000 and 2010.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  24841342     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the incidence of reported venomous snakebites in the state of New York between 2000 and 2010.
METHODS: Data were collected retrospectively from the National Poison Data System (NPDS) and then reviewed for species identification and clinical outcome while using proxy measures to determine incidence of envenomation.
RESULTS: From 2000 to 2010 there were 473 snakebites reported to the 5 Poison Control Centers in the state of New York. Venomous snakes accounted for 14.2% (67 of 473) of these bites. Only 35 bites (7%) required antivenom. The median age of those bitten by a venomous snake was 33. Most victims were male.
CONCLUSIONS: Although not rare, venomous snakebites do not occur commonly in New York State, with a mean of just 7 bites per year; fortunately most snakebites reported are from nonvenomous snakes. Yet even nonvenomous bites have the potential to cause moderately severe outcomes. Medical providers in the state should be aware of their management.
Authors:
Jeremy D Joslin; Jeanna M Marraffa; Harinder Singh; Joshua Mularella
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-5-16
Journal Detail:
Title:  Wilderness & environmental medicine     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1545-1534     ISO Abbreviation:  Wilderness Environ Med     Publication Date:  2014 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-5-20     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9505185     Medline TA:  Wilderness Environ Med     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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