Document Detail


[In Process Citation].
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23535476     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Comparative quality measurements and evaluations in nursing play significant roles. Quality measures are affected by systematic and random error. Statistical Process Control (SPC) offers a method to take random variation adequately into account. In this article, control charts are introduced. Those are graphical displays to show quality measures over time. Attribute variables can be displayed by p-, u- and c-control charts. Special cause variations within the processes can be detected by rules. If signs for special cause variations are absent, the process in considered being in statistical control showing common cause variation. A deviation of one data point greater than three standard deviations from the arithmetic mean is considered the strongest signal for non random variation within the process. Within quality improvement contexts control charts outperform traditional comparisons of means and spreads.
Authors:
Jan Kottner; Armin Hauss
Publication Detail:
Type:  English Abstract; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pflege     Volume:  26     ISSN:  1012-5302     ISO Abbreviation:  Pflege     Publication Date:  2013 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-03-28     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8907069     Medline TA:  Pflege     Country:  Switzerland    
Other Details:
Languages:  ger     Pagination:  119-27     Citation Subset:  N    
Affiliation:
Clinical Research Center for Hair and Skin Science, Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin.
Vernacular Title:
Vergleichende Qualitätsmessungen Teil 2: Regelkarten.
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