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Hypertension in obesity: is leptin the culprit?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23333346     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The number of obese or overweight humans continues to increase worldwide. Hypertension is a serious disease that often develops in obesity, but it is not clear how obesity increases the risk of hypertension. However, both obesity and hypertension increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In this review, we examine how obesity may increase the risk of developing hypertension. Specifically, we discuss how the adipose-derived hormone leptin influences the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), through actions in the brain to elevate energy expenditure (EE) while also contributing to hypertension in obesity.
Authors:
Stephanie E Simonds; Michael A Cowley
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2013-1-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  Trends in neurosciences     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1878-108X     ISO Abbreviation:  Trends Neurosci.     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-1-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7808616     Medline TA:  Trends Neurosci     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Monash Obesity & Diabetes Institute, Department of Physiology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.
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