Document Detail


How much muscle strength is required to walk in a crouch gait?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22959837     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Muscle weakness is commonly cited as a cause of crouch gait in individuals with cerebral palsy; however, outcomes after strength training are variable and mechanisms by which muscle weakness may contribute to crouch gait are unclear. Understanding how much muscle strength is required to walk in a crouch gait compared to an unimpaired gait may provide insight into how muscle weakness contributes to crouch gait and assist in the design of strength training programs. The goal of this study was to examine how much muscle groups could be weakened before crouch gait becomes impossible. To investigate this question, we first created muscle-driven simulations of gait for three typically developing children and six children with cerebral palsy who walked with varying degrees of crouch severity. We then simulated muscle weakness by systematically reducing the maximum isometric force of each muscle group until the simulation could no longer reproduce each subject's gait. This analysis indicated that moderate crouch gait required significantly more knee extensor strength than unimpaired gait. In contrast, moderate crouch gait required significantly less hip abductor strength than unimpaired gait, and mild crouch gait required significantly less ankle plantarflexor strength than unimpaired gait. The reduced strength required from the hip abductors and ankle plantarflexors during crouch gait suggests that weakness of these muscle groups may contribute to crouch gait and that these muscle groups are potential targets for strength training.
Authors:
Katherine M Steele; Marjolein M van der Krogt; Michael H Schwartz; Scott L Delp
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2012-09-05
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of biomechanics     Volume:  45     ISSN:  1873-2380     ISO Abbreviation:  J Biomech     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-01     Completed Date:  2013-02-12     Revised Date:  2013-10-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0157375     Medline TA:  J Biomech     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  2564-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5450, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Ankle
Biomechanics
Cerebral Palsy / complications,  physiopathology*
Child
Computer Simulation
Gait / physiology
Gait Disorders, Neurologic / etiology,  physiopathology*
Hip
Humans
Knee
Models, Anatomic*
Muscle Strength / physiology*
Muscle, Skeletal / physiology*
Posture
Resistance Training
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 HD033929/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01HD033929/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R24 HD065690/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R24HD065690/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U54 GM072970/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS; U54GM072970/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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