Document Detail


How does coping help people resist lapses during smoking cessation?
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17209700     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether types of coping strategies have differential effects on preventing lapses and lowering urge levels and to investigate mechanisms by which coping strategies prevent lapses during smoking cessation. DESIGN: Sixty-one respondents performed ecological momentary assessment using palm-top computers and tape recorders to report their coping strategies and urge levels before and after temptations to smoke. Multilevel linear regression models were used to compare the effects of individual strategy types with the average strategy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lapses versus resisted temptations and changes in urge levels. RESULTS: Number of strategies significantly predicted resisting smoking and change in urge levels. Compared with the effect of the average strategy, movement/exercise was marginally worse at preventing lapses, and food/drink was marginally related to higher postcoping urge levels. CONCLUSION: Although using multiple coping strategies helps people resist the urge to smoke, no particular coping strategy works better than any other. Coping strategies prevent lapses by reducing high urge levels during temptations.
Authors:
Kathleen A O'Connell; Vanessa L Hosein; Joseph E Schwartz; Ruth Q Leibowitz
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association     Volume:  26     ISSN:  0278-6133     ISO Abbreviation:  Health Psychol     Publication Date:  2007 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-01-09     Completed Date:  2007-03-15     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8211523     Medline TA:  Health Psychol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  77-84     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health and Behavior Studies, Teachers College Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA. oconnell@tc.columbia.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adaptation, Psychological*
Adult
Behavior Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Recurrence / prevention & control
Smoking Cessation / psychology*
Treatment Outcome

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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