Document Detail


Higher ambulatory blood pressure is associated with aortic valve calcification in the elderly: a population-based study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23150510     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Aortic valve calcification (AVC) without outflow obstruction (stenosis) is common in the elderly and increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although high blood pressure (BP) measured at the doctor's office is known to be associated with AVC, little is known about the association between 24-hour ambulatory BP (ABP) and AVC. Our objective was to clarify the association between ABP variables and AVC. The study population consisted of 737 patients (mean age, 71±9 years) participating in the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions study who underwent 24-hour ABP monitoring. Each aortic valve leaflet was graded on a scale of 0 (normal) to 3 (severe calcification). A total valve score (values 0-9) was calculated as the sum of all leaflet scores. Advanced AVC (score ≥4) was present in 77 subjects (10.4%). All of the systolic ABP variables (except systolic BP nocturnal decline) and mean asleep diastolic BP were positively associated with advanced calcification, whereas normal dipping status and diastolic BP nocturnal decline were negatively associated. Multiple regression analysis indicated that mean awake diastolic BP (odds ratio, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.01-1.71]) and asleep diastolic BP (odds ratio, 1.34 [95% CI, 1.04-1.72]) remained independently associated with advanced calcification after adjustment for age, sex, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, serum creatinine, and any degree of aortic insufficiency. Diastolic ABP is independently associated with advanced calcification. This finding may have important implications in gaining further insight into the mechanism of AVC.
Authors:
Shinichi Iwata; Cesare Russo; Zhezhen Jin; Joseph E Schwartz; Shunichi Homma; Mitchell S V Elkind; Tatjana Rundek; Ralph L Sacco; Marco R Di Tullio
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2012-11-12
Journal Detail:
Title:  Hypertension     Volume:  61     ISSN:  1524-4563     ISO Abbreviation:  Hypertension     Publication Date:  2013 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-12-13     Completed Date:  2013-02-27     Revised Date:  2014-01-10    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7906255     Medline TA:  Hypertension     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  55-60     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve / pathology*,  physiopathology
Blood Pressure / physiology*
Calcinosis / complications*,  pathology,  physiopathology
Female
Heart Valve Diseases / complications*,  pathology,  physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension / complications*,  pathology,  physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K24 NS062737/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS029993/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS036286/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS36286/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R37 NS029993/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R37 NS29993/NS/NINDS NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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