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Heart failure and Alzheimer's disease.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  25041352     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
It has recently been proposed that heart failure is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Decreased cerebral blood flow and neurohormonal activation due to heart failure may contribute to the dysfunction of the neurovascular unit and cause an energy crisis in neurons. This leads to the impaired clearance of amyloid beta and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, resulting in the formation of amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this article we will summarize the current understanding of the relationship between heart failure and Alzheimer's disease based on epidemiological studies, brain imaging research, pathological findings and the use of animal models. The importance of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, blood pressure and valve disease as well as the effect of relevant medications will be discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Authors:
Pavla Cermakova; Maria Eriksdotter; Lars H Lund; Bengt Winblad; Piotr Religa; Dorota Religa
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2014-7-15
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of internal medicine     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1365-2796     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Intern. Med.     Publication Date:  2014 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-7-21     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8904841     Medline TA:  J Intern Med     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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