Document Detail


Healthcare seeking behaviour for Buruli ulcer in Benin: a model to capture therapy choice of patients and healthy community members.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18617207     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Buruli ulcer is a devastating condition emerging in West Africa. We investigated why patients often report late to the hospital. Health seeking behaviour determinants and stigma were studied by in-depth interviews in patients treated in hospital (n=107), patients treated traditionally (n=46) of whom 22 had active disease, and healthy community control subjects (n=107). We developed a model capturing internal and external factors affecting decision making. With increasing severity, extent and duration of Buruli ulcer, a shift of influencing factors on health seeking behaviour appears to occur. Factors causing delay in presenting to hospital were the use of traditional medicine before presenting at the treatment centre; costs and duration of admission; disease considered not serious enough; witchcraft perceived as the cause of disease; and fear of treatment, which patients expected to be amputation. This study confirms the importance of self-treatment and traditional healing in this area. Our study was performed before antimicrobial treatment was introduced in Benin; we suggest that this model and the results from this analysis should be used as a baseline from which to measure the influence of the introduction of antimicrobial treatment on health seeking behaviour for Buruli ulcer in Benin.
Authors:
Annelies A Mulder; Roelien P Boerma; Yves Barogui; Claude Zinsou; R Christian Johnson; Jules Gbovi; Tjip S van der Werf; Ymkje Stienstra
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2008-07-09
Journal Detail:
Title:  Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene     Volume:  102     ISSN:  0035-9203     ISO Abbreviation:  Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.     Publication Date:  2008 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-08-06     Completed Date:  2008-12-12     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7506129     Medline TA:  Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  912-20     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Benin
Buruli Ulcer / psychology*,  therapy
Child
Female
Health Behavior*
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care*
Prejudice
Questionnaires

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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