Document Detail


Health-related behaviors in the Republic of Karelia, Russia, and North Karelia, Finland.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16250791     Owner:  NLM     Status:  PubMed-not-MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Risk factors and health behaviors related to chronic diseases were studied in a population survey in Pitkäranta District in the Republic of Karelia, Russia, and in North Karelia, Finland, in Spring 1992 (Puska, Matilainen et al., 1993). The random sample of the population (25 to 64 years) was 1,000 in Pitkäranta and 2,000 in North Karelia. Among men there were more current smokers in Pitkäranta than in North Karelia (65% vs. 31%) whereas among women the respective rates were 11% and 16%. Self-reported alcohol consumption was higher in North Karelia. Leisure time physical activity was much less frequent in Pitkäranta both among men and women. Use of vegetables and berries was very infrequent in Pitkäranta. The differences in health behavior can at least partly explain the differences in risk factors and in mortality of chronic diseases.
Authors:
T K Matilainen; P Puska; M A Berg; S Pokusajeva; N Moisejeva; M Uhanov; A Artemjev
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of behavioral medicine     Volume:  1     ISSN:  1070-5503     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Behav Med     Publication Date:  1994  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-10-27     Completed Date:  2006-02-03     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9421097     Medline TA:  Int J Behav Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  285-304     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Helsinki, Finland.
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