Document Detail


Health literacy explains racial disparities in diabetes medication adherence.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21951257     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Although low health literacy and suboptimal medication adherence are more prevalent in racial/ethnic minority groups than Whites, little is known about the relationship between these factors in adults with diabetes, and whether health literacy or numeracy might explain racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes medication adherence. Previous work in HIV suggests health literacy mediates racial differences in adherence to antiretroviral treatment, but no study to date has explored numeracy as a mediator of the relationship between race/ethnicity and medication adherence. This study tested whether health literacy and/or numeracy were related to diabetes medication adherence, and whether either factor explained racial differences in adherence. Using path analytic models, we explored the predicted pathways between racial status, health literacy, diabetes-related numeracy, general numeracy, and adherence to diabetes medications. After adjustment for covariates, African American race was associated with poor medication adherence (r = -0.10, p < .05). Health literacy was associated with adherence (r = .12, p < .02), but diabetes-related numeracy and general numeracy were not related to adherence. Furthermore, health literacy reduced the effect of race on adherence to nonsignificance, such that African American race was no longer directly associated with lower medication adherence (r = -0.09, p = .14). Diabetes medication adherence promotion interventions should address patient health literacy limitations.
Authors:
Chandra Y Osborn; Kerri Cavanaugh; Kenneth A Wallston; Sunil Kripalani; Tom A Elasy; Russell L Rothman; Richard O White
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of health communication     Volume:  16 Suppl 3     ISSN:  1087-0415     ISO Abbreviation:  J Health Commun     Publication Date:  2011  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-09-28     Completed Date:  2012-02-13     Revised Date:  2014-09-08    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9604100     Medline TA:  J Health Commun     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  268-78     Citation Subset:  T    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
African Americans / psychology*,  statistics & numerical data
Aged
Diabetes Mellitus / drug therapy,  ethnology*
European Continental Ancestry Group / psychology,  statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Literacy*
Health Status Disparities*
Humans
Male
Mathematics
Medication Adherence / ethnology*,  statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K01 DK087894/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K01DK087894/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K23 DK080952/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K23 DK092470/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K24 DK077875/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P60 DK020593/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P60DK020593-3052/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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