Document Detail


HIV and recent illicit drug use interact to affect verbal memory in women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23392462     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: HIV infection and illicit drug use are each associated with diminished cognitive performance. This study examined the separate and interactive effects of HIV and recent illicit drug use on verbal memory, processing speed, and executive function in the multicenter Women's Interagency HIV Study.
METHODS: Participants included 952 HIV-infected and 443 HIV-uninfected women (mean age = 42.8, 64% African-American). Outcome measures included the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised and the Stroop test. Three drug use groups were compared: recent illicit drug users (cocaine or heroin use in past 6 months, n = 140), former users (lifetime cocaine or heroin use but not in past 6 months, n = 651), and nonusers (no lifetime use of cocaine or heroin, n = 604).
RESULTS: The typical pattern of recent drug use was daily or weekly smoking of crack cocaine. HIV infection and recent illicit drug use were each associated with worse verbal learning and memory (P < 0.05). Importantly, there was an interaction between HIV serostatus and recent illicit drug use such that recent illicit drug use (compared with nonuse) negatively impacted verbal learning and memory only in HIV-infected women (P < 0.01). There was no interaction between HIV serostatus and illicit drug use on processing speed or executive function on the Stroop test.
CONCLUSIONS: The interaction between HIV serostatus and recent illicit drug use on verbal learning and memory suggests a potential synergistic neurotoxicity that may affect the neural circuitry underlying performance on these tasks.
Authors:
Vanessa J Meyer; Leah H Rubin; Eileen Martin; Kathleen M Weber; Mardge H Cohen; Elizabeth T Golub; Victor Valcour; Mary A Young; Howard Crystal; Kathryn Anastos; Bradley E Aouizerat; Joel Milam; Pauline M Maki
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)     Volume:  63     ISSN:  1944-7884     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.     Publication Date:  2013 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-04-11     Completed Date:  2013-06-24     Revised Date:  2014-05-07    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100892005     Medline TA:  J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  67-76     Citation Subset:  IM; X    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
African Americans
Aged
Cocaine-Related Disorders / complications*,  psychology
Cognition
Crack Cocaine / adverse effects
Executive Function
Female
HIV Infections / complications*,  psychology
Heroin / adverse effects
Heroin Dependence / complications*,  psychology
Humans
Memory / drug effects*
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Street Drugs / adverse effects*
Verbal Learning / drug effects*
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1F31DA028573/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; 1K01MH098798-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; F31 DA028573/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; K12 HD055892/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; K12HD055892/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; P30 AI082151/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; U01 AI031834/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; U01 AI034993/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; U01 AI034994/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; U01 AI035004/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; U01 AI042590/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; U01 HD032632/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; UL1 RR024131/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UO1-AI-31834/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; UO1-AI-34989/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; UO1-AI-34993/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; UO1-AI-34994/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; UO1-AI-35004/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; UO1-AL-42590//PHS HHS; UO1-HD-32632/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Crack Cocaine; 0/Street Drugs; 70D95007SX/Heroin
Comments/Corrections

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