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GROWTH RATE VARIATION AMONG PASSERINE SPECIES IN TROPICAL AND TEMPERATE SITES: AN ANTAGONISTIC INTERACTION BETWEEN PARENTAL FOOD PROVISIONING AND NEST PREDATION RISK.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21644952     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Causes of interspecific variation in growth rates within and among geographic regions remain poorly understood. Passerine birds represent an intriguing case because differing theories yield the possibility of an antagonistic interaction between nest predation risk and food delivery rates on evolution of growth rates. We test this possibility among 64 Passerine species studied on three continents, including tropical and north and south temperate latitudes. Growth rates increased strongly with nestling predation rates within, but not between, sites. The importance of nest predation was further emphasized by revealing hidden allometric scaling effects. Nestling predation risk also was associated with reduced total feeding rates and per-nestling feeding rates within each site. Consequently, faster growth rates were associated with decreased per-nestling food delivery rates across species, both within and among regions. These relationships suggest that Passerines can evolve growth strategies in response to predation risk whereby food resources are not the primary limit on growth rate differences among species. In contrast, reaction norms of growth rate relative to brood size suggest that food may limit growth rates within species in temperate, but not tropical, regions. Results here provide new insight into evolution of growth strategies relative to predation risk and food within and among species.
Authors:
Thomas E Martin; Penn Lloyd; Carlos Bosque; Daniel C Barton; Atilio L Biancucci; Yi-Ru Cheng; Riccardo Ton
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-2-3
Journal Detail:
Title:  Evolution; international journal of organic evolution     Volume:  65     ISSN:  1558-5646     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-6-7     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0373224     Medline TA:  Evolution     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  1607-1622     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
© 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.
Affiliation:
U. S. Geological Survey Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, University of Montana, Montana 59812 E-mail: tom.martin@umontana.edu Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812 Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, DST/NRF Centre of Excellence, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa E-mail: penn.lloyd@gmail.com Departamento Biología Organismos, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas, Venezuela E-mail: carlosb@usb.ve E-mail: daniel.barton@umontana.edu E-mail: luis.biancucci@gmail.com E-mail: yirucheng@gmail.com E-mail: zvoneb@libero.it.
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