Document Detail


Group A streptococcal meningitis: report of two cases.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9515681     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a very uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with less than 30 cases reported in the last quarter of a century. A recent worldwide increase in the incidence and severity of disease due to Streptococcus pyogenes has been observed. Although a rise of incidence of cases of GAS meningitis has not been shown, severe and fulminant cases have been reported in the literature in the last few years. We performed a retrospective analysis of the computer data of cerebrospinal fluid cultures from July 1987 to December 1995 at the Hadassah University Medical Center in Jerusalem, and report two cases of GAS meninigitis: one with a primary infection acquired through bacteraemia, in a 2-month-old child, and another with meninigitis secondary to cranial surgery in a 75-year-old patient. The cases are discussed and a literature review is presented.
Authors:
A E Moses; M Beeri; D Engelhard
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of infection     Volume:  36     ISSN:  0163-4453     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Infect.     Publication Date:  1998 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1998-04-28     Completed Date:  1998-04-28     Revised Date:  2005-11-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7908424     Medline TA:  J Infect     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  116-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Bacteremia / complications
Humans
Infant
Male
Meningitis, Bacterial / epidemiology,  microbiology*
Postoperative Complications / microbiology
Retrospective Studies
Streptococcus pyogenes / isolation & purification*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Successful treatment of disseminated coccidioidomycosis with amphotericin B lipid complex.
Next Document:  A child case of haemophagocytic syndrome associated with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.