Document Detail


Group influences on individuals' drinking and other drug use at clubs.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23384376     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: This article examines effects of the social group on individual alcohol and drug use upon entry and exit from the club. Based on collected biological measurements of alcohol and other drug use, this study explores whether social group indicators (e.g., group characteristics) are predictive of alcohol and other drug use for individual club patrons.
METHOD: A total of 368 social groups, representing 986 individuals (50.7% female), were anonymously surveyed, and biological measures of alcohol and other drug use were collected at entrance and exit to clubs on a single evening. Both individual and group-level indicators were assessed. Because data were clustered by club, event, and group, mixed-model regressions were conducted to account for non-independence.
RESULTS: Group indicators of high blood alcohol concentration were being in a group that intends to get drunk, that has at least one member who regularly gets drunk, and that has discrepancies in its expectations regarding drug use. Group indicators related to cocaine use were high levels of drug use expected among group members, little discrepancy among the group members regarding the drug use expected, and high levels of intentions to get drunk. In addition, older groups were more likely to have higher levels of cocaine use. There were less consistent findings regarding group effects on marijuana use. The most consistent finding was that high drug use expectations were related to higher levels of marijuana use.
CONCLUSIONS: Together, these data suggest that strategies should focus on recognizing group indicators as risks for group members. Promoting social responsibility for group members may create safer club experiences among young adults. These efforts could model designated-driver programs as a way to increase safety and social responsibility.
Authors:
Brenda A Miller; Hilary F Byrnes; Amy Branner; Mark Johnson; Robert Voas
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs     Volume:  74     ISSN:  1938-4114     ISO Abbreviation:  J Stud Alcohol Drugs     Publication Date:  2013 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-02-06     Completed Date:  2013-07-22     Revised Date:  2014-03-06    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101295847     Medline TA:  J Stud Alcohol Drugs     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  280-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking / epidemiology*
Alcoholic Intoxication / epidemiology
Cluster Analysis
Cocaine-Related Disorders / epidemiology
Data Collection
Ethanol / administration & dosage*,  blood
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking / epidemiology
Peer Group
Regression Analysis
Restaurants
Social Behavior*
Social Responsibility
Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology*
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1 RC1-AA019110-01/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS; 5 R01-DA018770-04/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA018770/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; RC1 AA019110/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
3K9958V90M/Ethanol
Comments/Corrections

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