Document Detail


Groundwater discharge: potential association with fecal indicator bacteria in the surf zone.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15296305     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Short-lived radium isotopes (223Ra and 224Ra) are used to investigate the potential association between groundwater discharge and microbial pollution at Huntington Beach, CA. We establish the tidally driven exchange of groundwater from the surficial beach aquifer across the beach face. Groundwater is found to be a source of nutrients (silica, inorganic nitrogen, and orthophosphate) to the surf zone, and these nutrients could possibly provide an environment for enhanced growth or increased persistence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). Ammonium and ortho-phosphate explain up to 12-20% of the variance in FIB levels in the surf zone. Elevated levels of FIB were only found in 1 of the 26 groundwater samples. However, FIB in the surf zone covary with radium at fortnightly, diurnal, and semi-diurnal tidal periods. In addition, radium accounts for up to 38% of the variance in log-FIB levels in the surf zone. A column experiment illustrates that Enterococcus suspended in Huntington Beach saline groundwater is not significantly filtered by sand collected from the field. This work establishes a mechanism for the subterranean delivery of FIB pollution to the surf zone from the surficial aquifer and presents evidence that supports an association between groundwater discharge and FIB.
Authors:
Alexandria B Boehm; Gregory G Shellenbarger; Adina Paytan
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Environmental science & technology     Volume:  38     ISSN:  0013-936X     ISO Abbreviation:  Environ. Sci. Technol.     Publication Date:  2004 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-08-05     Completed Date:  2004-11-01     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0213155     Medline TA:  Environ Sci Technol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  3558-66     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Environmental Science and Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4020, USA. aboehm@stanford.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
California
Enterobacteriaceae
Enterococcus
Filtration
Fresh Water / analysis,  microbiology*
Models, Theoretical*
Nitrates / analysis
Oceanography
Phosphates / analysis
Quaternary Ammonium Compounds / analysis
Radioactive Tracers
Radium*
Seawater / analysis,  microbiology*
Silicon Compounds / analysis
Water Movements*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Nitrates; 0/Phosphates; 0/Quaternary Ammonium Compounds; 0/Radioactive Tracers; 0/Silicon Compounds; 7440-14-4/Radium

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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