Document Detail


Grit, conscientiousness, and the transtheoretical model of change for exercise behavior.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22904153     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Grit and the Big Five Inventory (BFI) Conscientiousness dimension were examined with respect to the transtheoretical model (TTM) stages of change for exercise behavior. Participants (N = 1171) completed an online survey containing exercise-related TTM staging questions, the Short Grit Scale and BFI Conscientiousness. Ordinal regression analyses showed that grit significantly predicted high intensity and moderate intensity exercise TTM stage while BFI Conscientiousness did not. The results suggest that grit is a potentially important differentiator of TTM stage for moderate and high intensity exercise.
Authors:
Justy Reed; Brian Pritschet; David M Cutton
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-8-17
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of health psychology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1461-7277     ISO Abbreviation:  J Health Psychol     Publication Date:  2012 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-8-20     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9703616     Medline TA:  J Health Psychol     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Chicago State University, USA.
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