Document Detail


Greater corticolimbic activation to high-calorie food cues after eating in obese vs. normal-weight adults.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22063094     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The goal of this research is to identify the neural response to rewarding food cues before and after eating in overweight/obese (OB) and normal-weight (NW) adults. Based on the previous literature, we expected greater differential activation to food cues vs. objects for OB compared to NW participants both prior to eating and after consumption of a typical lunch. Twenty-two overweight/obese (11 male) and 16 normal-weight (6 male) individuals participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging task examining neural response to visual cues of high- and low-calorie foods before and after eating. The OB group demonstrated increased neural response to high- and low-calorie foods after eating in comparison to the NW participants in frontal, temporal, and limbic regions. In addition, greater activation in corticolimbic regions (lateral OFC, caudate, anterior cingulate) to high-calorie food cues was evident in OB vs. NW participants after eating. These findings suggest that for OB individuals, high-calorie food cues show sustained response in brain regions implicated in reward and addiction even after eating. Moreover, food cues did not elicit similar brain response after eating in the NW group suggesting that neural activity in response to food cues diminishes with reduced hunger for these individuals.
Authors:
Anastasia Dimitropoulos; Jean Tkach; Alan Ho; James Kennedy
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2011-10-30
Journal Detail:
Title:  Appetite     Volume:  58     ISSN:  1095-8304     ISO Abbreviation:  Appetite     Publication Date:  2012 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-01-23     Completed Date:  2012-05-17     Revised Date:  2014-03-25    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8006808     Medline TA:  Appetite     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  303-12     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Brain / physiology*
Cluster Analysis
Cues*
Eating
Energy Intake*
Female
Food*
Humans
Hunger / physiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods
Male
Obesity / metabolism*
Reward
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R03 HD058766-01/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R03 HD058766-02/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R03HD058766-01/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; UL1 RR024989/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1 RR024989/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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