Document Detail


Glossopharyngeal insufflation induces cardioinhibitory syncope in apnea divers.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20623312     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Apnea divers increase intrathoracic pressure voluntarily by taking a deep breath followed by glossopharyngeal insufflation. Because apnea divers sometimes experience hypotension and syncope during the maneuver, they may serve as a model to study the mechanisms of syncope. We recorded changes in hemodynamics and sympathetic vasomotor tone with microneurography during breath holding with glossopharyngeal insufflation. Five men became hypotensive and fainted during breath holding with glossopharyngeal insufflation within the first minute. In four divers, heart rate dropped suddenly to a minimum of 38 ± 4 beats/min. Therefore, cardioinhibitory syncope was more common than low cardiac output syncope.
Authors:
Gordan Dzamonja; Jens Tank; Karsten Heusser; Ivan Palada; Zoran Valic; Darija Bakovic; Ante Obad; Vladimir Ivancev; Toni Breskovic; André Diedrich; Friedrich C Luft; Zeljko Dujic; Jens Jordan
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2010-07-11
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical autonomic research : official journal of the Clinical Autonomic Research Society     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1619-1560     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin. Auton. Res.     Publication Date:  2010 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-11-03     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9106549     Medline TA:  Clin Auton Res     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  381-4     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Clinical Hospital Split, Split, Croatia.
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