Document Detail


Global-feature classification can be acquired more rapidly than local-feature classification in both humans and pigeons.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15069610     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
When humans process visual stimuli, global information often takes precedence over local information. In contrast, some recent studies have pointed to a local precedence effect in both pigeons and nonhuman primates. In the experiment reported here, we compared the speed of acquisition of two different categorizations of the same four geometric figures. One categorization was on the basis of a local feature, the other on the basis of a readily apparent global feature. For both humans and pigeons, the global-feature categorization was acquired more rapidly. This result reinforces the conclusion that local information does not always take precedence over global information in nonhuman animals.
Authors:
Kazuhiro Goto; A J Wills; Stephen E G Lea
Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article     Date:  2003-10-11
Journal Detail:
Title:  Animal cognition     Volume:  7     ISSN:  1435-9448     ISO Abbreviation:  Anim Cogn     Publication Date:  2004 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-04-07     Completed Date:  2004-06-29     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9814573     Medline TA:  Anim Cogn     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  109-13     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Washington Singer Laboratories, University of Exeter, EX4 4QG, Exeter, UK. K.Goto@exeter.ac.uk
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Animals
Behavior, Animal / physiology
Classification*
Columbidae / physiology*
Discrimination Learning*
Form Perception
Humans
Mental Processes*
Pattern Recognition, Visual*
Species Specificity

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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