Document Detail


Ginkgo biloba decreases acute mountain sickness in people ascending to high altitude at Ollagüe (3696 m) in northern Chile.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18076292     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To determine the prophylactic effect of Ginkgo biloba (doses 80 mg/12 h, 24 h before high-altitude ascension and with continued treatment) in preventing acute mountain sickness (AMS) at 3696 m in participants without high-altitude experience. METHODS: Thirty-six participants who reside at sea level were transported to an altitude of 3696 m (Ollagüe). The participants were divided into 3 groups and received G biloba (n=12) 80 mg/12 h, acetazolamide (n=12) 250 mg/12 h, or placebo (n=12) 24 hours before ascending and during their 3-day stay at high altitude. The Lake Louise Questionnaire constituted the primary outcome measurement at sea level and at 3696 m. A Lake Louise Self-Report Score greater than 3 was indicative of AMS. Oxygen saturation, heart rate, and arterial pressure were taken with each evaluation for AMS. RESULTS: A significant reduction in AMS was observed in the group that received G biloba (0%, P<.05) comparison with the groups receiving acetazolamide (36%, P<.05) or placebo (54%). No difference was observed in arterial oxygen saturation in the G biloba (92+/-2) vs the acetazolamide (89+/-2) groups. However, a marked increased saturation in arterial oxygen was seen in comparison with the placebo group (84+/-3, P<.05). No statistically significant differences were observed in mean arterial pressure or heart rate. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence supporting the use of G biloba in the prevention of AMS, demonstrating that 24 hours of pretreatment with G biloba and subsequent maintenance during exposure to high altitude are sufficient to reduce the incidence of AMS in participants with no previous high-altitude experience.
Authors:
Fernando A Moraga; Alejandro Flores; Jordi Serra; Carla Esnaola; Corina Barriento
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Wilderness & environmental medicine     Volume:  18     ISSN:  1080-6032     ISO Abbreviation:  Wilderness Environ Med     Publication Date:  2007  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-12-13     Completed Date:  2008-02-01     Revised Date:  2008-04-23    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9505185     Medline TA:  Wilderness Environ Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  251-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Laboratorio de Fisiología, Escuela de Medicina, Universidad Católica del Norte, Coquimbo-Chile. fmoraga@ucn.cl
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Acetazolamide / therapeutic use
Adult
Altitude
Altitude Sickness / drug therapy,  prevention & control*
Blood Pressure / drug effects,  physiology
Chile
Ginkgo biloba / chemistry*
Heart Rate / drug effects,  physiology
Humans
Male
Oxygen Consumption / drug effects,  physiology
Phytotherapy*
Plant Extracts / therapeutic use*
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Plant Extracts; 59-66-5/Acetazolamide
Comments/Corrections
Erratum In:
Wilderness Environ Med. 2008 Spring;19(1):51

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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