Document Detail


Gestational weight gain and predicted changes in offspring anthropometrics between early infancy and 3 years.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22434753     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To determine how gestational weight gain (GWG), categorized using the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations, relates to changes in offspring weight-for-age (WAZ), length-for-age (LAZ) and weight-for-length z-scores (WLZ) between early infancy and 3 years.
METHODS: Women with singleton infants were recruited from the third cohort of the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study (2001-2005). Term infants with at least one weight or length measurement during the study period were included (n = 476). Multivariable linear mixed effects regression models estimated longitudinal changes in WAZ, LAZ and WLZ associated with GWG.
RESULTS: In early infancy, compared with infants of women with adequate weight gain, those of women with excessive weight gains had higher WAZ, LAZ and WLZ. Excessive GWG ≥ 200% of the recommended amount was associated with faster rates of change in WAZ and LAZ and noticeably higher predicted mean WAZ and WLZ that persisted across the study period.
CONCLUSIONS: GWG is associated with significant differences in offspring anthropometrics in early infancy that persisted to 3 years of age. More longitudinal studies that utilize maternal and paediatric body composition measures are necessary to understand the nature of this association.
Authors:
A L Deierlein; A M Siega-Riz; A H Herring; L S Adair; J L Daniels
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-02-10
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatric obesity     Volume:  7     ISSN:  2047-6310     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatr Obes     Publication Date:  2012 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-03-21     Completed Date:  2012-07-24     Revised Date:  2013-06-26    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101572033     Medline TA:  Pediatr Obes     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  134-42     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
© 2012 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.
Affiliation:
School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina Gillings, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. andrea.deierlein@mssm.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry*
Child Development / physiology*
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity / epidemiology*
Predictive Value of Tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications / epidemiology*,  physiopathology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects / epidemiology*,  physiopathology
Risk Assessment / methods
Risk Factors
Weight Gain / physiology*
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DK56350/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; DK61981/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; HD37584/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HD39373/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; P30 DK056350-05S1/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DK061981-01/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 HD037584/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD037584-01A1/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD039373-01A1/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R24 HD050924/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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