Document Detail


Gestational diabetes and subsequent growth patterns of offspring: the National Collaborative Perinatal Project.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21327952     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Our objective was to test the hypothesis that intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes [GDM] predicts childhood growth independent of the effect on infant birthweight. We conducted a prospective analysis of 28,358 mother-infant pairs who enrolled in the National Collaborative Perinatal Project between 1959 and 1965. The offspring were followed until age 7. Four hundred and eighty-four mothers (1.7%) had GDM. The mean birthweight was 3.2 kg (range 1.1-5.6 kg). Maternal characteristics (age, education, race, family income, pre-pregnancy body mass index and pregnancy weight gain) and measures of childhood growth (birthweight, weight at ages 4, and 7) differed significantly by GDM status (all P < 0.05). As expected, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, mothers with GDM gave birth to offspring that had higher weights at birth. The offspring of mothers with GDM were larger at age 7 as indicated by greater weight, BMI and BMI z-score compared to the offspring of mothers without GDM at that age (all P < 0.05). These differences at age 7 persisted even after adjustment for infant birthweight. Furthermore, the offspring of mothers with GDM had a 61% higher odds of being overweight at age 7 compared to the offspring of mothers without GDM after adjustment for maternal BMI, pregnancy weight gain, family income, race and birthweight [OR = 1.61 (95%CI:1.07, 1.28)]. Our results indicate that maternal GDM status is associated with offspring overweight status during childhood. This relationship is only partially mediated by effects on birthweight.
Authors:
Kesha Baptiste-Roberts; Wanda K Nicholson; Nae-Yuh Wang; Frederick L Brancati
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Maternal and child health journal     Volume:  16     ISSN:  1573-6628     ISO Abbreviation:  Matern Child Health J     Publication Date:  2012 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-01-06     Completed Date:  2012-05-25     Revised Date:  2013-07-19    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9715672     Medline TA:  Matern Child Health J     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  125-32     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Nursing, Penn State University, University Park, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. kab50@psu.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Birth Weight*
Body Mass Index*
Body Weight
Child Development / physiology
Diabetes, Gestational / epidemiology*,  physiopathology
Female
Fetal Macrosomia / epidemiology*,  physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Mothers
Obesity / epidemiology,  physiopathology*
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects / physiopathology*
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K23 DK067944/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K23-DK067944/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K24 DK062222/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K24-DK6222/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P60 DK079637/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P60 DK79637/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; T32-HL07024/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; UL1 RR025005/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections
Erratum In:
Matern Child Health J. 2012 Jan;16(1):266

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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